Posts Tagged ‘REST API’

Beginning the new, looking back to the old

January 17, 2017

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The month of January is named after the God Janus – who both looked forward to the new year and back to the old one. So it is perhaps time to set ourselves up for what will be no doubt another very busy year for IBM MQ by a quick review of 2016 – looking at what you should have seen, and also finding time to tell you something new, which you are unlikely to be aware of.

So a quick recap first. In June we released a hardware refresh for the IBM MQ Appliance, adding large capacity SSDs and additional 10Gb network ports as described here. And IBM MQ brought out MQ V9.0 with a new option for end-to-end encryption with an order of magnitude performance boost, and CCDTs now accessed through a URI – and this was described here.

There were additional enhancements in November with IBM MQ moving to MQ V9.0.1 – the first Continuous Delivery release, with MFT enhancements and repackaged MFT Agents, availability of the new MQ Console, and the initial delivery of REST API verbs. These were all described here. And the IBM MQ Appliance also moved the MQ V9.0.1 and added additional features like Floating IP support, SNMP and LDAP authentication of admin accounts. This was written up here.

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So if we are all ok with that, I had better share the news that you missed at the end of last year. First a word or two about Processor Value Units. This is IBM’s typical capacity based pricing metric for software. Each machine type and processor type has a PVU rating per core. And software products like IBM MQ have a price per PVU. So as a customer you buy a number of PVU entitlements to meet your capacity need and then deploy IBM MQ on the hardware that matches the PVUs you have bought. However this means you need to always count and be sure that the capacity you have provided to IBM MQ is in line with the entitlement you have, and the physical machines you are running on. But more and more these days software is being deployed on environments that are more abstracted from the actual physical machines – and the capacity being allocated, either on premise or in a cloud, is assigned as virtual cores. But with IBM MQ (and other products) priced only by PVUs, there was some confusion in mapping PVUs to virtual cores.

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On December 6th 2016, IBM MQ addressed this by adding a Virtual Processor Core metric to its pricing. This is only available as a monthly pricing metric but provides a new simple, and possibly more appropriate way of buying capacity for IBM MQ deployed in these virtual environments either on premise or in clouds where IBM MQ is deployed with a number of virtual cores of capacity rather than into a fixed physical machine. This is an additional metric. The PVU metric with both perpetual and monthly pricing is still available, but customers now have an additional option of the Virtual Processor Core pricing. There is no announcement letter for this, but the pricing is already available for IBM MQ and for IBM MQ Advanced, so simply ask your IBM sales rep or business partner about this if you want to know more.

Certain customers who can find it difficult to count PVUs might find this very useful. These might include customers such as retailers or retail banks where IBM MQ can be installed in 1000+ different environments, and for customers like this there are other ways to price for this type of deployment so again ask your IBM rep.

That was the last news and updates from 2016, but there is plenty to come in 2017. And you don’t need to wait for long. Just one week to go and I expect to have something new to share here. Not long to wait.

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Power is nothing without control – IBM MQ V9.0.1

November 15, 2016

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As mentioned on this blog before, much of the modern world runs on, and depends on IBM MQ. Whether sending credit card details from a retail store, tracking a shipping delivery, coordinating stock levels at a factory or processing an insurance claim, IBM MQ is at the heart of thousands of leading businesses, keeping their business running, always available and secure.

So, IBM MQ runs at the heart of your business, helping to keep your applications simple, yet connecting them with reliability and security, highly scalable and highly available, whether processing 1 transaction per day, or 10 billion messages per day. But however it runs in your businesses, it doesn’t run itself. Half of the value of IBM MQ is not just the assured once and once only delivery but that your business has the visibility that the message was delivery successfully or not. And to help your business understand that, IBM MQ can provide lots of information about MQ itself and its activity.

For years IBM MQ has offered a number of different ways in which to configure, manage and control itself. There has been MQ Explorer, MQSC, PCF.

With the release of MQ V9.0.1 – which is the first ‘Continuous Delivery’ release to build on top of MQ V9, IBM has brought new ways for the customer to control and manage their IBM MQ infrastructure.

The first new tool is the MQ Console – this is a browser based tool to configure and manage your MQ infrastructure. You may be aware we have had the MQ Console available on the MQ Appliance since its release in 2015, but this is the first time you can use the MQ Console with MQ software installs as well.

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The MQ Console adds some key benefits for customers. One is that you can use a browser and so you don’t need to install anything – unlike the MQ Explorer. Another is that you can customize the MQ Console to show you just what you are interested in – with widgets to show you activity on a queue, or what queues are defined. IBM will continue to update it, but it shouldn’t be seen as a replacement for the existing tools such as MQ Explorer, but rather an additional option.

The MQ Console is built on top of a REST API – and another feature in MQ V9.0.1 is to begin to expose an external REST API. While initially in this release there are only a couple of verbs published, the goal is to continue to add to these in future releases such as 9.0.2, 9.0.3 etc. Many customers will be looking to take the REST API and build new custom tooling to meet their specific needs. It is possible that various 3rd parties such as the numerous skilled IBM MQ business partners may use this new API to build their own offerings, or even custom offerings for individual customers.

Additionally, there have been some updates to the IBM MQ Managed File Transfer function, available in IBM MQ Advanced. As well as limiting the number of retries when there are failures in using the FTP Protocol Bridge, there is a packaging and install change for the MQ MFT Agent. Previously this was only available as a part of the overall IBM MQ install package – and it required a full install procedure. In the IBM MQ V9.0.1 release, the MQ MFT Agent is now available separately as a zip file. This means that it is now much easier to embed this capability as part of a customer created solution which can then be distributed without the need for the full MQ package or a dedicated install just for the MQ MFT Agent component.

As you can see all of these new features, in the first of these Continuous Delivery releases for IBM MQ V9 provide new value that is specifically aimed at making it easier to take advantage of the IBM MQ capabilities – and take back control of your systems.

Don’t forget you can get a free 90 trial of MQ and see for yourself. And you should also be able to download the MQ Advanced for Developers offering for free development and test.

UPDATE: An excellent blog on the MQDev developerWorks expanding on this topic

Maybe you can now see why it reminded me of the famous series of adverts from Pirelli from maybe a decade ago – Power is nothing without control. IBM MQ gives your business the power of reliable and secure movement of data. Now we are making it easier for you to take control.

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[Having used Ed Moses in a previous blog, it is nice to continue the theme of great athletes with Carl Lewis in this one]