Posts Tagged ‘Replicated Data Queue Managers’

Ensuring your business and customers see you as Highly Available thanks to MQ Advanced

July 19, 2018

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How high is high? If you are considering climbing, then Everest is pretty high after all at 8848M above sea level. Although without the right equipment, team and preparation, trying to climb just 2M can be impossible. But ‘high’ is used in other contexts as well. Like when you are trying to keep a business running these days. If you are then it’s likely the high you may be thinking about is High Availability. Without the right approach, tools and infrastructure you may be trying to solve a problem that can seem to be the same scale as Everest.

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With business becoming more global, and being more responsive to events, and with mobile or web traffic coming direct from partners, customers or suppliers, downtime has to be avoided. How do you keep your systems up, your applications running and your data available all the time? Even when, inevitably, there are failures?

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IBM MQ is a critical part of your business connectivity. It provides a reliable, secure, scalable and robust middleware layer connecting applications, systems and services and exchanging data between them. Making use of IBM MQ ensures your applications can be simpler and more agile, yet more reliable, and also easier to shift between deployment environments. Your applications will rely on IBM MQ persisting their messages, ensuring that messages are never lost. How do you reap these rewards of simpler applications unless the MQ middleware is highly available to ensure the applications can keep running?

 

Having been around for 25 years, IBM MQ understands this need very well. As such it provides a variety of ways to configure and manage High Availability. And the most recent innovation, based on the High Availability approach used in the MQ Appliance is designed to not only offer extremely robust and effective high availability, but at the same time ensuring it is simple to set up and maintain, without additional external complexity: Replicated Data Queue Managers.

 

Many clients were facing the same set of problems: they didn’t like the costs and complexity of providing and maintaining network attached storage, which was a common way of providing high availability for MQ. The request was high availability that was more self-contained, without external dependencies. A way to deploy MQ in highly available configurations without the requirement for an environment that needs lots of setup, with highly skilled resources and additional costs.

RDQM1

With IBM MQ V9.1, our new Long-Term Support release, customers can now take advantage of Replicated Data Queue Managers, which offer a 3-node configuration, making use of replicated local storage, which make the MQ messages available on each of 3 MQ systems, instead of relying on a single copy of data on network storage.

 

Instead of requiring lots of setup, and ongoing extensive maintenance, MQ itself will do almost all the setup during the initial MQ install. Then, when you are creating a Queue Manager, you simply request it as a RDQM resource, and that’s pretty much all that’s needed. And it’s not just simple in the configuration of the Queue Managers. As it supports Floating IP, when one Queue Manager fails, and another instance automatically starts up on one of the other 2 nodes, the original Queue Manager IP address will move with it, meaning the applications are essentially unaware of the move, and the workload is uninterrupted as the messages and logs had been kept up to date synchronously on all 3 systems.

 

With an additional option allowing for manual startup in a replicated pair of systems by choosing either synchronous or asynchronous replication to provide Disaster Recovery configurations, this new approach to HA really goes a long way to make it much simpler to reach the highest peaks of high availability.

 

There are already a few places to look for more information on this exciting new development. There is a technical blog entry by John Colgrave, along with a GitHub community, and of course the Knowledge Center.

 

Suitable for customers on RedHat Linux on the x86 platform, you need MQ Advanced licensing on just one system node, and MQ Advanced High Availability Replica licensing on the other 2 nodes. Also, this can’t be used with container deployments – but virtual machine images or bare metal is fine. With RDQM now part of the Long-Term Support release of MQ V9.1, you can scale the highest peaks of availability. You are not starting at base camp. You are already close to the summit. Let’s get to the top.

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Two steps forward, no steps back with IBM MQ V9.0.4

October 24, 2017

hopscotch

Compromise is everywhere. We are told to take the rough with the smooth. The easy with the hard. The quick win and the hard slog. And with software we often have to accept compromises. Especially so these days with the drive for new function forcing some compromises with stable deployments.

Not so with the latest update to the MQ family of products. For the last 15 months IBM has been delivering updates to MQ using a Continuous Delivery stream. There have been many useful additions, but they have always required adoption of the latest version to take advantage of the new features. With the latest update moving to MQ V9.0.4, there are even more substantial updates of useful features for both base MQ and MQ Advanced. However in recognition of the need for customers to keep some systems back-level while also wanting to take advantage of new features, some of these updates are designed to allow existing deployed systems to take advantage of the new capabilities, both without being updated and without breaking the Continuous Delivery and Long Term Support principles.

In addition to this extremely useful update, which I will get to in a minute, which can be used across the entire MQ estate, there are some groundbreaking updates that will allow huge changes in the way MQ is used, deployed and managed in this update. It is more leaps forward rather than steps forward.

For MQ Advanced we have 3 key new capabilities:

  • A new ‘easy HA’ feature – Replicated Data Queue Managers
  • More flexible Managed File Transfer deployments
  • Availability of an enhanced Blockchain bridge

For MQ Base (which is part of MQ Advanced) there are a number of other enhancements

  • Additional commands supported as part of the REST API for admin
  • Availability of a ‘catch-all’ for MQSC commands as part of the REST API for admin
  • Ability to use a single MQ V9.0.4 Queue Manager as a single point gateway for REST API based admin of other MQ environments including older MQ versions such as MQ V9 LTS and MQ V8.
  • Ability to use MQ V9.0.4 as a proxy for IBM Cloud Product Insights reporting across older deployed versions of MQ
  • Availability of an enhanced MQ bridge for Salesforce
  • Initial availability of a new programmatic REST API for messaging applications

 

All of these features are called out in the new announcement letter for MQ V9.0.4 here. And there are further updates available for the MQ Appliance listed in the specific announcement letter for it here and in another blog entry here. There are also announcement letters for IBM MQ z/OS V9.0.4 and IBM MQ Advanced for z/OS VUE V9.0.4

However, let’s try and call out some details of the key points of the MQ V9.0.4 update below:

RDQM1

The new High Availability feature (officially described as Replicated Data Queue Managers or RDQM) provides a significant new way to configure High Availability. It is only available for MQ Advanced users on x86 Red Hat Linux. It is designed as a 3 node system which uses replication of messages and logs between the local disks available to each Queue Manager. This style of replication of local disks was previously only available with the MQ Appliance. As moving to this new style of HA will allow customers to stop using network storage for MQ, we anticipate it will be very popular. As well as the disk level replication, Floating IP will be used to help applications move seamlessly to a failover QM. And 3 nodes help to prevent ‘split-brain’ situations where 2 nodes are simultaneously active.

The licensing of the above deployment requires MQ Advanced as already stated. However as long as all Queue Managers on all 3 nodes are Replicated Data Queue Managers, and all 3 systems are the same capacity, then only one node needs to have a MQ Advanced license entitlement. The other 2 nodes can be licensed with MQ Advanced High Availability Replica parts (these parts used to be called Idle Standby parts).

RESTproxy

The changes to the REST API for admin are also significant. Over the last few releases more and more ‘verbs’ have been added to allow REST API calls to configure and manage MQ. This was designed to allow more modern tools to be built as an alternative to MQSC and PCF based tooling. The latest V9.0.4 release adds more verbs and also a way to call the remaining equivalent MQSC functions within a REST API structure. However what is perhaps more interesting is that a single V9.0.4 Queue Manager can now act as a ‘gateway’ Queue Manager to allow these new REST API driven tools to configure and manage Queue Managers that are older and don’t include this new Continuous Delivery function. This is hopefully a very good way of providing the best of both worlds. Allowing the older production Queue Managers to remain deployed but still take advantage of new features.

Similar to this ‘bridge’ feature is one for IBM Cloud Product Insights, where the ability to publish deployed Queue Manager data to Cloud Product Insights was limited to releases on the Continuous Delivery stream, but now a single V9.0.4 Queue Manager enables older installs to publish data to this useful dashboard tool.

The MQ bridge for Salesforce has been enhanced to allow MQ to publish data into Salesforce, instead of simply receiving push notifications from Salesforce.

Customers with MQ Advanced who want to explore the possibilities offered by Blockchains now can deploy a bridge which enables MQ applications to query the Blockchain, and also provide data input into it. An earlier version of this was available only to customers with MQ Advanced for z/OS VUE, but this version is available to customers using MQ Advanced on distributed platforms.

MQ Advanced customers also get more flexibility in how they can deploy the file logger in MQ Managed File Transfer scenarios, as this logger can now be deployed on a different machine to the MQ Queue Manager.

And finally, feedback from customers told us that developers were looking to make sure of MQ, but with fewer dependencies, to free them up from client and language bindings. As such we have also added the first layer of support for a new set of programmatic REST APIs for messaging applications. This will replace the previous HTTPBridge function which has already been deprecated. Over the next few releases it is hoped that more functions will be supported in this REST API for messaging to allow additional messaging calls to be supported.

Counting up the advances it does look like it is more than 2 steps forward, and certainly no steps back. And with the ability to use some of these features alongside your older MQ releases, what are you waiting for? Download it from here today. Or try it on Amazon AWS Quick Start.

Want to know more. Check out the webcast. Register or replay at this link.