Posts Tagged ‘Reliable Messaging’

Don’t get caught out by clouds of hot air. IBM MQ builds reliable bridges in a multi-cloud world.

October 5, 2018

oldmanyells

More and more businesses are realizing the value of moving to the cloud. There are as many, if not more reasons to move to the cloud as there are different clouds. Any single business is likely to have already deployed to multiple different clouds, both public and private. And different departments will have different priorities and success goals covering agility, availability, location, cost, or multiple other reasons. Certainly some businesses will be looking for the expected benefits of cloud but want to still run in their own data center using a private cloud architecture.

 

Central to these decisions are the business applications, which are already changing rapidly, benefitting from this new deployment environment. Cloud deployed applications typically scale more readily and may be built out of many cloud specific common services, designed to maximize the positive aspects of deploying and running in the cloud, and not have you running off a cliff, instead of running into the future.

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There are however other important design points. If an application is built solely to use the tools and environment specific to a single cloud, then flexibility and freedom to change will be limited. Around 80% of businesses already admit to using more than one cloud provider, which will see a need for applications running on different clouds to connect together, as well as connecting to any applications still running on-premises. Additionally, applications may need to use functions that are available on multiple different cloud environments in case the applications need to be redeployed on other clouds. And that will definitely be important when it comes to the connectivity mechanism for data exchange between applications.

 

IBM MQ was originally built to connect applications running in different environments, allowing them to exchange data with reliability and security, and to provide a common, cross-platform way for applications to do so. And this is exactly the challenge now being faced with applications built for different environments having to connect and exchange data across different clouds as well and into and out of the on-premises data center.

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A strong benefit of IBM MQ is that all applications can drive their connectivity through a single consistent interface. This not only simplifies the application development, but ensures that the application can remain unaware of not just where it is running itself, but also where the applications that it is trying to connect with are running.

 

As an asynchronous messaging layer, IBM MQ can buffer the connectivity between applications that run at different speeds, and also, with MQ running in every locations, then connectivity breaks between locations, or latency issues can be handled by IBM MQ rather than by complex logic within the applications.

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IBM MQ is able to be deployed as an IBM managed and hosted messaging server on IBM Cloud and AWS, or deployed and managed by customers on any public cloud. And on-premises, IBM MQ can be deployed in mainframes, as a physical appliance, or on servers such as Linux, Windows or more, in containers or in VMs. This flexibility, combined with the persistence, security, reliability, scalability and high availability that much of the world’s leading businesses depend on mean that you can move to the cloud with confidence.

 

There is no better way to bridge between your applications and across the clouds that with IBM MQ.

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What is happening in your business? What are your customers doing? Let IBM Event Streams show you the way ahead

September 27, 2018

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You are developing applications to make your business more responsive. The heart of your business depends on the once-and-once-only delivery of IBM MQ messages to ensure your invoicing, shipment and supply-chain applications can reliably and securely move data between systems, and keep your business running smoothly. But you need to do more.

The world is moving faster, and your customers are harder to reach, and harder to keep. You need to build applications that engage more directly with customers, providing your business with an increased level of insight into their behavior as they engage with you online.

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You want to be in more control and respond to the events taking place triggered by your customers. To do this your new engaging applications need to be event driven and inform you of each action and activity as it happens. Although you know the benefits that IBM MQ provides with messaging, you want to receive a greater amount of data from these new applications as a stream of events, which is a different type of messaging to that provided by IBM MQ.

What you need is IBM Event Streams, powered by Apache Kafka. Newly announced by IBM, and becoming Generally Available on Friday September 28th, 2018, this offering will allow you to build new applications using Kafka clusters deployed on-premises or in a cloud environment. Your applications can now be built to take advantage of streaming event data offering more insight for your business. As an added benefit IBM Event Streams not only comes with IBM’s enterprise class support, but also a bridge to allow connectivity between IBM MQ and IBM Event Streams. You can then feed your applications with activity in your core business applications, as well as your new event streaming applications.

And the place to start is our webinar on October 2nd 2018. Presented by Alan Chatt, you can hear all the details you need to get started with IBM Event Streams. Register here.

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No waiting in these queues. IBM MQ V9 and the MQ Appliance M2001 delivers fast, reliable and secure message queuing

June 29, 2016

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Recent weeks have been pretty busy on this blog, reflecting just how busy the MQ development team has been in bringing out new and updated offerings in MQ V9 and the MQ Appliance M2001 here and here. And of course in our cloud messaging options.

As both of these have been fairly full of new content I thought I would do just a short update to focus on a couple of key benefits which are specifically measurable in these 2 refreshed offerings. After all, a lot of the new and improved features can sometimes be hard to quantify in terms of the benefits they provide, but in each offering this time there are some easy to define benefits.

As you may have seen in my most recent update, the MQ Appliance M2001 added large capacity SSD storage which enables much faster throughput for persistent messages. These are the messages that get written to storage to ensure they are still available in the case of failure before the message has been successfully deliver to all consumers. At high rates of message throughput, there can be a lot of contention for access to storage with traditional hard drives. With the new MQ Appliance M2001, this potential bottleneck has been removed. You can now read the latest MQ Appliance M2001 performance report here which shows that the performance in those scenarios which saw large volumes of persistent messages sees improvement of up to 3.5 times the previous message rate.

Clearly this represents a significant improvement and given that persistent messages are used in those business critical situations where IBM MQ delivers so much value, it is a hugely important benefit.

 

In MQ V9 there were a number of enhancements but the one I specifically want to call out is, as part of the MQ Advanced package, the enhancement to MQ Advanced Message Security (MQ AMS). The change here was to add a new mode of operation – Confidentiality. This new mode changed the way in which the encryption operations are performed on the message contents (MQ AMS offers policy based encrypted message contents which ensures data at rest is protected in case of a security breach). The goal of this change was to continue to offer a strong level of security for the message contents without too big of an impact on the performance and throughput from the effects of the encryption used.

Now instead of new asymmetric keys being generated for every exchange, the feature can be configured to allow for reusable symmetric keys to be used after the initial generation of an asymmetric key. This still provides a very high level of security, but depending on the reuse count before a new asymmetric key is generated, can drastically cut the performance overhead. The benefits can see more than an order of magnitude increase in throughput. You can see a quick snap shot of some of the early results in Jon Rumsey’s blog here – which includes a small table showing performance improvements exceeding 10x gains. With everyone concerned about security these days, the ability to better protect your information and customer data with little performance impact has to be a good thing.

 

So what are you waiting for? With secure, reliable enterprise messaging for on-premise deployments, cloud deployments or physical appliances, there is no waiting with IBM MQ V9 or IBM MQ Appliance M2001.

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[An interesting history of Wile E. Coyote here]

IBM MQ V9 – A fast, secure, reliable and more agile MQ

April 19, 2016

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Some of you reading this blog may recall the great athlete Ed Moses – who had a record 122 race winning streak in just about the hardest event – the 400M Hurdles. You need to be strong, fast, and agile just to compete, and to keep winning you need to be reliable. Well, this is how we view IBM MQ, especially with the latest release – IBM MQ V9. You may have seen a recent blogpost on here that had a Statement of Direction talking about a new way of delivering IBM MQ – one that provided a Long Term Support release, and a Continuous Delivery release. The aim of this model is to give customers more choice to select either highly stable releases with just fixes, or releases that benefitted from additional function in the fixpacks.

TRY IT: Click here to get a free trial of MQ

UPDATE: There is a FAQ on the new support model. Read it here.

On April 19th, IBM announced MQ V9 which is the first release that moves to this new more agile delivery model. As such at the initial release it delivers a small set of additional capabilities that will be available to all customers. Then subsequent mod-level updates will deliver even more updates to customers choosing the continuous delivery stream, but all customers moving to V9 will get the benefit of the new capabilities being delivered in this release.

As with previous releases of IBM MQ, customers have a lot of choice in where and how they may want to deploy this version. IBM supports deployment of MQ – and MQ Advanced pretty much on every commercial IT environment where business critical applications may be exchanging data reliably, securely, and at scale. This could be on-premise, deployed in cloud environments like IBM Softlayer, Microsoft Azure or Amazon AWS. IBM also supports virtualization with many customers deploying in VM images, and also in Docker containers, which can be deployed anywhere, including in IBM’s Bluemix platform. This flexibility enables customers to make use of enterprise messaging to support deployments on-premise, on cloud or in hybrid environments.

So what are the key new features of MQ V9 being delivered in this release? Well there are a number of them that are called out in the announcement letters – so you can read the MQ V9 distributed announcement letter here. And the MQ V9 z/OS MLC announcement letter here. And you can read the MQ V9 One Time Charge announcement letter here. But below I will call out a few of the features that I think will be most important to customers.

One of the features likely to be most interesting is a change to the MQ Client Channel Definition Table (CCDT), which is needed by the MQ Client application to provide the channel definitions needed to connect to the MQ Queue Manager. This file is created automatically and prior to MQ V9 needed to be distributed to the client application prior to use. The big change from this new release is that the CCDT can be a web addressable file instead of needing to be distributed out to every client, and to then need to do that with every change. By having a web addressable CCDT accessed by URI, then there are much lower administration needs, and also the MQ infrastructure can be much more dynamic as changes can be made centrally and take effect quickly and without application disruption.

 

The second big change to the new release of MQ is in MQ Advanced Message Security (MQ AMS). This feature, which is a priced extension to MQ (available either separately or as a part of MQ Advanced) provides policy based encryption at rest of the MQ message contents. By using this capability, businesses can be assured that their message contents can only be unencrypted and read by the targeted application destination, and there is no risk of exposure should any security breach take place which provides access to the system or storage where the MQ Queue Manager holds its queues. This privacy and integrity has been assured by the generation of asymmetric keys for every exchange between client and queue manager, which provides an extremely high level of security, but can introduce a high overhead in terms of the processor cost of the asymmetric key generation.

MQ AMS performance

With MQ V9, a new mode of operation is added to MQ AMS, called ‘Confidentiality’. In this mode there is an initial asymmetric key exchange then subsequent exchanges can reuse (to an extent that can be configured) a symmetric key. This still provides a high level of security and protection for the message content, but with a dramatically lower level of overhead in terms of encryption workload cost. IBM expects that due to the increasing importance of security and protecting systems and data from breaches, that this new feature of MQ AMS will help more customers protect their message contents and therefore their business and customer data. IBM expects to produce performance data for the new AMS configuration around the time that MQ V9 is generally available. But the early testing shows considerable improvement.

 

A further change for MQ AMS is the support of non-IBM JREs for use with MQ AMS. Previously applications written in Java that relied on a non-IBM JRE wouldn’t work with MQ AMS. In MQ V9 this has now changed so that suitable non-IBM JREs can be used, as well as IBM JREs, extending the ability of more customers to use MQ AMS.

 

There are a number of other new functions and capabilities available in MQ V9, such as updates to MQ Managed File Transfer capabilities – which are described in the announcement letter, and with the movement to a Continuous Delivery model customers should expect to see more capabilities being delivered in mod levels on top of MQ V9 in the future.

 

With the recent announcement of the End of Support for MQ V7.1 – announced here – along with the related end of support of the older separate versions of MQ FTE and MQ AMS, this latest release of MQ V9, along with the recent announcement of the update to the MQ Appliance provides customers with a strong set of choices of how to take advantage of the latest new releases as they plan to move off the older releases of MQ they may be using, keeping their deployment of MQ up to date and supported.

When you are taking advantage of the benefits of IBM MQ, you may not need to have to work as hard as Ed Moses did to be #1.

UPDATE: Mark Taylor has provided one of his highly useful videos detailing more of the new function in MQ V9. Watch it here.