Posts Tagged ‘Oh Boy’

When is a quantum leap not really a quantum leap?

November 3, 2015

Electronimage

A quantum leap, if I remember correctly, is the movement of an electron from one energy level to another energy level. So it is not really a big change – just the change from one discrete level to another discrete level. However the phrase “quantum leap” is often used to describe a big change, when in fact it is describing a very small change. Just like a quantum leap, MQ get updated from one fixpack to another. Sometimes this can be thought of as a small change. However in the case of the latest update to MQ V8, this change can represent significant change and new opportunities for MQ users. When an electron does a quantum leap and drops down to a lower energy level and emits a photon, let’s shine a light on the changes in the latest update to IBM MQ.

Last week, on October 23 2015, IBM brought out an update to IBM MQ V8 that included not just fixes, but some really important new features and functions. I will call out some of these here, and hopefully also link to some other sources of information to find out more about the parts I don’t cover.

The key enhancements I am going to cover are the addition of full MQ Light API support within IBM MQ, and also what we are calling the redistributable MQ Client. There are plenty of others (another interesting new feature is setting a Message Expiry Cap) and these are described in Mark Taylor’s short presentation – which can be found here 

Let’s start with the addition of the MQ Light API as a fully supported option. You can read my previous blog on MQ Light here   – but as a recap, MQ Light is a new API for messaging which is designed to allow developers working with Javascript, Ruby, PHP, etc. to make use of messaging as a part of their applications. This enables them to code microservices, and build applications making use of buffering, but doesn’t force them to learn the richer, more complex MQ API or JMS, or require them to code in C or Java. MQ Light is a good way for many enterprises to start to change some of their infrastructure into Hybrid deployments, supporting both on-premise and cloud deployments.  In this latest update, IBM MQ itself now supports the MQ Light API. So these developers can continue to script their applications making use of the MQ Light API in whichever environment they prefer, but now IBM MQ itself acts as the messaging provider. As these MQ Light  applications publish their messages or listen for their subscriptions using the AMQP protocol, this means that AMQP clients can now for the first time connect in to IBM MQ which is then receiving published messages and forwarding them on, or routing the subscriptions to the applications. By ensuring that only a single messaging runtime environment is needed, this lowers the operational burden, reducing complexity for the infrastructure team, and keeps costs down, while keeping the application developers happy with their preferred development environment and API. And the infrastructure team can ensure they support the growing demand for Hybrid infrastructure for cloud deployed applications, while still meeting their enterprise qualities of service for their middleware infrastructure.

The other key update concerns the MQ Client. The MQ Client is how many MQ customers make use of MQ, embedding the client libraries in their applications which then send and receive MQ messages. In this new update the MQ Clients are now also available as tar or zip files for easy embedding in the applications themselves. As well as removing the requirement for a separate install process, the license has been updated to allow applications that include the MQ Clients to be distributed inside and outside the enterprise without requiring permission from IBM as had been the case in the past, which had prevented the easy inclusion of the MQ Client libraries in many solutions. From now on, the MQ Client can be included in any solution, easily packaged and distributed to allow the seamless distribution and deployment of MQ connected applications anywhere required. I am looking forward to seeing many more customer and vendor applications including the MQ Client libraries from now on.

These two changes are substantial enhancements and dramatically change the options available for businesses looking to use IBM MQ for messaging, making this a real leap into the future, for both on-premise business critical applications and the rapidly changing world of Hybrid Integration.

For more details on using MQ Light and AMQP with IBM MQ to enable Hybrid deployments and more see here.

And for more information on the re-distributable MQ Client see here.

A leap into the future, and into the past was the subject of another ‘Quantum Leap’ – this time a TV series from the late 80s/early 90s. Scientist Sam Beckett would ‘leap’ from body to body throughout time. I guess that’s another example of a quantum leap not being quite a quantum leap. As he used to say when he leapt into someone else: “oh boy”.

QL-ohboy

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