Posts Tagged ‘MQ Light’

IBM MQ V9 – A fast, secure, reliable and more agile MQ

April 19, 2016

edwin-moses-getty_2129850b

Some of you reading this blog may recall the great athlete Ed Moses – who had a record 122 race winning streak in just about the hardest event – the 400M Hurdles. You need to be strong, fast, and agile just to compete, and to keep winning you need to be reliable. Well, this is how we view IBM MQ, especially with the latest release – IBM MQ V9. You may have seen a recent blogpost on here that had a Statement of Direction talking about a new way of delivering IBM MQ – one that provided a Long Term Support release, and a Continuous Delivery release. The aim of this model is to give customers more choice to select either highly stable releases with just fixes, or releases that benefitted from additional function in the fixpacks.

TRY IT: Click here to get a free trial of MQ

UPDATE: There is a FAQ on the new support model. Read it here.

On April 19th, IBM announced MQ V9 which is the first release that moves to this new more agile delivery model. As such at the initial release it delivers a small set of additional capabilities that will be available to all customers. Then subsequent mod-level updates will deliver even more updates to customers choosing the continuous delivery stream, but all customers moving to V9 will get the benefit of the new capabilities being delivered in this release.

As with previous releases of IBM MQ, customers have a lot of choice in where and how they may want to deploy this version. IBM supports deployment of MQ – and MQ Advanced pretty much on every commercial IT environment where business critical applications may be exchanging data reliably, securely, and at scale. This could be on-premise, deployed in cloud environments like IBM Softlayer, Microsoft Azure or Amazon AWS. IBM also supports virtualization with many customers deploying in VM images, and also in Docker containers, which can be deployed anywhere, including in IBM’s Bluemix platform. This flexibility enables customers to make use of enterprise messaging to support deployments on-premise, on cloud or in hybrid environments.

So what are the key new features of MQ V9 being delivered in this release? Well there are a number of them that are called out in the announcement letters – so you can read the MQ V9 distributed announcement letter here. And the MQ V9 z/OS MLC announcement letter here. And you can read the MQ V9 One Time Charge announcement letter here. But below I will call out a few of the features that I think will be most important to customers.

One of the features likely to be most interesting is a change to the MQ Client Channel Definition Table (CCDT), which is needed by the MQ Client application to provide the channel definitions needed to connect to the MQ Queue Manager. This file is created automatically and prior to MQ V9 needed to be distributed to the client application prior to use. The big change from this new release is that the CCDT can be a web addressable file instead of needing to be distributed out to every client, and to then need to do that with every change. By having a web addressable CCDT accessed by URI, then there are much lower administration needs, and also the MQ infrastructure can be much more dynamic as changes can be made centrally and take effect quickly and without application disruption.

 

The second big change to the new release of MQ is in MQ Advanced Message Security (MQ AMS). This feature, which is a priced extension to MQ (available either separately or as a part of MQ Advanced) provides policy based encryption at rest of the MQ message contents. By using this capability, businesses can be assured that their message contents can only be unencrypted and read by the targeted application destination, and there is no risk of exposure should any security breach take place which provides access to the system or storage where the MQ Queue Manager holds its queues. This privacy and integrity has been assured by the generation of asymmetric keys for every exchange between client and queue manager, which provides an extremely high level of security, but can introduce a high overhead in terms of the processor cost of the asymmetric key generation.

MQ AMS performance

With MQ V9, a new mode of operation is added to MQ AMS, called ‘Confidentiality’. In this mode there is an initial asymmetric key exchange then subsequent exchanges can reuse (to an extent that can be configured) a symmetric key. This still provides a high level of security and protection for the message content, but with a dramatically lower level of overhead in terms of encryption workload cost. IBM expects that due to the increasing importance of security and protecting systems and data from breaches, that this new feature of MQ AMS will help more customers protect their message contents and therefore their business and customer data. IBM expects to produce performance data for the new AMS configuration around the time that MQ V9 is generally available. But the early testing shows considerable improvement.

 

A further change for MQ AMS is the support of non-IBM JREs for use with MQ AMS. Previously applications written in Java that relied on a non-IBM JRE wouldn’t work with MQ AMS. In MQ V9 this has now changed so that suitable non-IBM JREs can be used, as well as IBM JREs, extending the ability of more customers to use MQ AMS.

 

There are a number of other new functions and capabilities available in MQ V9, such as updates to MQ Managed File Transfer capabilities – which are described in the announcement letter, and with the movement to a Continuous Delivery model customers should expect to see more capabilities being delivered in mod levels on top of MQ V9 in the future.

 

With the recent announcement of the End of Support for MQ V7.1 – announced here – along with the related end of support of the older separate versions of MQ FTE and MQ AMS, this latest release of MQ V9, along with the recent announcement of the update to the MQ Appliance provides customers with a strong set of choices of how to take advantage of the latest new releases as they plan to move off the older releases of MQ they may be using, keeping their deployment of MQ up to date and supported.

When you are taking advantage of the benefits of IBM MQ, you may not need to have to work as hard as Ed Moses did to be #1.

UPDATE: Mark Taylor has provided one of his highly useful videos detailing more of the new function in MQ V9. Watch it here.

 

Going faster by not moving – IBM Appliance M2001

April 19, 2016

totoise-rocket-patch

Go faster. Faster. Move it! Or actually don’t move it. There are times when to go faster you need to stop moving. We are all familiar with the parable of the tortoise and the hare – where slow and steady wins the race. But what about not moving at all? Sometimes that makes you go much faster. And in the case of the latest update to the IBM MQ Appliance that is exactly what we are doing. Hopefully you already know about the MQ Appliance, which IBM releases early in 2015, and have continued to enhance since its release. You can read my original entry here, and the update at the end of last year here.

 

But today, April 19th, IBM is announcing another update to the MQ Appliance which not only provides additional functional enhancement, by allowing queue managers to both synchronously replicate for HA and also asynchronously replicate for DR, and adds support for the AMQP based MQ Light API, but also sees a small but important hardware update, making this a slightly refreshed model – the MQ Appliance M2001.

HA+DR

There are 2 key hardware changes in this model update. To help support the simultaneous HA and DR function, which would use both existing 10Gb network cards, the existing 2 port connection is being replaced with a 4 port connection, providing 4 of these 10GB network ports, enabling 2 to be used for HA and DR and ensuring 2 can be used by applications connecting to the appliance, as well as the existing 1Gb ports.

M2001

The second hardware change is the replacement of the existing pair of 1.2TB hard disk drives (HDD) with a pair of 3.2TB solid state drives (SSD). As well as the benefit of the greatly increased storage capacity, the major benefit of using SSDs is the increase in performance for persistent message throughput. The MQ Appliance is a highly capable system which can process a lot of MQ messages. However, when using persistent messaging, which needs to be written to disk, it is critical that the storage can keep pace with the high rate of workload being handled by the system and at times with heavy workloads the spinning disk simply couldn’t move fast enough. IBM has selected the latest generation of SSDs to provide large capacity, high performance for both reading and writing data at high rates, and also this latest generation of SSDs, even if the MQ Appliance is used heavily all day, every day, should last for the 5 year supported lifespan of the MQ Appliance. Therefore, this provides the payoff from our ‘tortoise and hare’ parable – with no moving parts in the SSDs, they can be a lot faster than spinning disks. Expect to see updated performance figures for the new MQ Appliance M2001 around the time of its availability (June 10th 2016), but early figures suggest for some workloads performance improvements of up to 3 times have been seen.

 

There continue to be 2 editions of the MQ Appliance – the M2001A, providing full access to all the processor cores, and the M2001B, which provides access only to a subset of the cores – with an upgrade available from the B to the A system if needed. For customers who may have already purchased the MQ Appliance M2000, please talk to your IBM sales rep to see whether your appliance can take advantage of an upgrade of the HDDs and network card if available.

 

With the improved HA and DR functions, the increased storage capacity and the greatly increased performance, IBM believes this enhanced MQ Appliance makes even more sense to be used as the heart of your IBM MQ deployment, or as a highly available pair of appliances that can be deployed anywhere you need MQ capability. And for customers who may be running older versions of MQ which were recently subject to an announcement of End of Support – as can be seen here – then the latest version of the IBM MQ Appliance can represent a very good deployment option which is then far simpler to deploy as well as to maintain.

 

By moving from spinning disks, to SSDs with no moving parts, you really can go faster by standing still.

 

 

When is a quantum leap not really a quantum leap?

November 3, 2015

Electronimage

A quantum leap, if I remember correctly, is the movement of an electron from one energy level to another energy level. So it is not really a big change – just the change from one discrete level to another discrete level. However the phrase “quantum leap” is often used to describe a big change, when in fact it is describing a very small change. Just like a quantum leap, MQ get updated from one fixpack to another. Sometimes this can be thought of as a small change. However in the case of the latest update to MQ V8, this change can represent significant change and new opportunities for MQ users. When an electron does a quantum leap and drops down to a lower energy level and emits a photon, let’s shine a light on the changes in the latest update to IBM MQ.

Last week, on October 23 2015, IBM brought out an update to IBM MQ V8 that included not just fixes, but some really important new features and functions. I will call out some of these here, and hopefully also link to some other sources of information to find out more about the parts I don’t cover.

The key enhancements I am going to cover are the addition of full MQ Light API support within IBM MQ, and also what we are calling the redistributable MQ Client. There are plenty of others (another interesting new feature is setting a Message Expiry Cap) and these are described in Mark Taylor’s short presentation – which can be found here 

Let’s start with the addition of the MQ Light API as a fully supported option. You can read my previous blog on MQ Light here   – but as a recap, MQ Light is a new API for messaging which is designed to allow developers working with Javascript, Ruby, PHP, etc. to make use of messaging as a part of their applications. This enables them to code microservices, and build applications making use of buffering, but doesn’t force them to learn the richer, more complex MQ API or JMS, or require them to code in C or Java. MQ Light is a good way for many enterprises to start to change some of their infrastructure into Hybrid deployments, supporting both on-premise and cloud deployments.  In this latest update, IBM MQ itself now supports the MQ Light API. So these developers can continue to script their applications making use of the MQ Light API in whichever environment they prefer, but now IBM MQ itself acts as the messaging provider. As these MQ Light  applications publish their messages or listen for their subscriptions using the AMQP protocol, this means that AMQP clients can now for the first time connect in to IBM MQ which is then receiving published messages and forwarding them on, or routing the subscriptions to the applications. By ensuring that only a single messaging runtime environment is needed, this lowers the operational burden, reducing complexity for the infrastructure team, and keeps costs down, while keeping the application developers happy with their preferred development environment and API. And the infrastructure team can ensure they support the growing demand for Hybrid infrastructure for cloud deployed applications, while still meeting their enterprise qualities of service for their middleware infrastructure.

The other key update concerns the MQ Client. The MQ Client is how many MQ customers make use of MQ, embedding the client libraries in their applications which then send and receive MQ messages. In this new update the MQ Clients are now also available as tar or zip files for easy embedding in the applications themselves. As well as removing the requirement for a separate install process, the license has been updated to allow applications that include the MQ Clients to be distributed inside and outside the enterprise without requiring permission from IBM as had been the case in the past, which had prevented the easy inclusion of the MQ Client libraries in many solutions. From now on, the MQ Client can be included in any solution, easily packaged and distributed to allow the seamless distribution and deployment of MQ connected applications anywhere required. I am looking forward to seeing many more customer and vendor applications including the MQ Client libraries from now on.

These two changes are substantial enhancements and dramatically change the options available for businesses looking to use IBM MQ for messaging, making this a real leap into the future, for both on-premise business critical applications and the rapidly changing world of Hybrid Integration.

For more details on using MQ Light and AMQP with IBM MQ to enable Hybrid deployments and more see here.

And for more information on the re-distributable MQ Client see here.

A leap into the future, and into the past was the subject of another ‘Quantum Leap’ – this time a TV series from the late 80s/early 90s. Scientist Sam Beckett would ‘leap’ from body to body throughout time. I guess that’s another example of a quantum leap not being quite a quantum leap. As he used to say when he leapt into someone else: “oh boy”.

QL-ohboy

IBM MQ Light – What’s in a name?

October 3, 2014

“A picture paints a thousand words”. A well-known phrase. Undoubtedly true, but a single word can be critical. Change a single word and the meaning of a sentence, a paragraph, maybe a whole book or more could be altered. So what about IBM MQ Light? Is it MQ, but Light? And what does Light mean in this case?
We see the description ‘Light’ every day. Some product advertises itself as “Light – all the flavour, half the fat”. You know the sort of thing. So does it apply to IBM MQ Light? How does this new product compare to IBM MQ itself?
Well, I would say that maybe the best way to think of it, is not IBM MQ but “Light”, but rather IBM MQ for those “Lightbulb” moments, such as when Archimedes shouted “EUREKA!”.

eureka
IBM MQ after all already delivers the benefits of messaging to millions of applications running in tens of thousands of businesses around the world. I have described some of those benefits on these pages already. It does this primarily for enterprise critical applications, written in C, Java or even COBOL, dealing with Systems of Record. These applications handle business critical transactions, moving key customer and enterprise data between applications systems and services. And it makes a lot of sense to ensure these applications, and the associated data can benefit from IBM MQ’s reliability, robustness, security and scalability. After all if you are moving and updating business transactions, you want to scale, be secure, and be highly available.
However, there are many millions more applications that don’t face the same requirements, but yet are still critically important to the business. Maybe the app helps the business interact with customers with more immediacy. Maybe it shares information more widely with partners. Maybe it is building brand awareness or promoting the business across different platforms and devices. These type of apps are written by a different type of developer, using different languages, for very different purposes to the more traditional application that works with the systems of record. These are unlikely to be updating business critical information systems or processing transactions, although they will need to interact with existing systems. So maybe they don’t need everything that IBM MQ has to offer. But does that mean they don’t need anything that IBM MQ has to offer?
Messaging as provided by IBM MQ, does after all benefit program architecture and operation. Applications can be simpler. Applications producing and consuming data at different rates can be easily buffered. And aspects of security can be built in. Along of course with the ability to connect and exchange data across different systems, even if one application is down.
If messaging can bring all these benefits, why would the programmers of all applications not use it, when there is a widespread and well proven technology like IBM MQ? We have already called out many of the reasons. The developers are a different set of people, with different skills, and code in languages that IBM MQ doesn’t natively support. And IBM MQ is designed around the needs of those critical business transactions. That doesn’t mean that it can’t handle simpler needs, but if you are not familiar with using IBM MQ, there can seem to be a lot more options in the API to deal with than maybe are needed for a different, more straightforward use case. So why not produce a messaging product, which takes everything from IBM MQ that would be useful to this new set of developers, but presents it to them with a simpler API, more in line with the restricted needs of the type of applications they are producing. This is what IBM has done with IBM MQ Light.
IBM MQ Light is a new and different messaging product from IBM. It aims to bring the benefits of messaging to a new set of developers building the latest applications for a rapidly changing world.
The goals of MQ Light are as follows:
• Provide messaging that application developers will love to use
• Help applications be responsive and scale to meet demand
• Make it easy to get access to the code and to start to use it – simply download, unzip, use
• Run on premise or on Bluemix in the cloud
• Offer simple, open APIs in a mix of popular scripting languages
• A new breed of tooling to ensure developers know what is happening to their messages
You can see by these goals, this is something new. And also MQ Light is not trying to be an alternative to IBM MQ. It is very different. It focuses on the needs of the new developers. And in keeping simple, it means that it doesn’t provide some of the key characteristics of IBM MQ. There is no clustering, no high availability, and no transaction support. If your application is likely to need those functions, then the right choice should be IBM MQ. If however your application doesn’t need any of those, but it still could benefit from messaging, allowing it to buffer and scale workload, respond to events, schedule actions or queue responses, then MQ Light may be a good match for them and their developers.
For development use, MQ Light is of course free to download, and is available on Windows and Linux for x86 or Mac OS X. Once applications are developed and ready to be put in production, they can be run on premise in the MQ Light runtime (payable per Install), or deployed using MQ Light in Bluemix (payable per Message). And in the future, as mentioned in the IBM MQ V8 announcement letter, there will be the ability to run MQ Light applications in IBM MQ itself.
All in all, enough to make a lightbulb go off in anyone’s head. If it is going on in yours – check out the MQ Light webcast to learn more. Or even better download it today and be using it in a few minutes.

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