Posts Tagged ‘Long Term Support’

Putting out a new release like IBM MQ V9.0.5 is more than a 9-5 job

March 16, 2018


At least in the UK, the traditional hours worked in a day job were 9 to 5. You would ‘clock-in’ at 9am and leave at 5pm. I guess it is common as there was a 1980s film called “9 to 5” starring Dolly Parton. These days office life is rather more flexible, and certainly the idea of clocking in and out at fixed times is gone.


For 25 years, virtually every major IT infrastructure has been able to rely on the secure and reliable exchange of data between applications and systems thanks to IBM MQ. Previously called MQSeries, then WebSphere MQ, this software offering, developed in the IBM Hursley Lab in the UK has been a critical part of the business world. So much so that most people living their lives have no idea they use IBM MQ so much on a daily basis as it ‘just works’.


There is a great team of developers who work hard day-in and day-out to enhance and update IBM MQ, and . We have now released IBM MQ V9.0.5, going GA on Friday March 16th. And our developers have worked for months, giving up evenings and weekends to not just add new features, but to make sure it is another offering that works when put into use. So not 9-5 at all.


Now for some customers this will be more of a prelude to the main act. This is referring to V9.0.5 being a Continuous Delivery release. When we brought out V9.0 we split it into 2 streams: Continuous Delivery and Long Term Support. This release marks the final release in the initial set of Continuous Delivery releases. The next release will be the first of a new Long Term Support release. And customers can expect that the functions delivered in the 5 CD releases will be made available in the new Long Term Support release.


When that new LTS release is available, you can expect me to summarize all the new features, but for now in this blog I will call out a few of the new features in V9.0.5.


The new Easy HA feature (Replicated Data Queue Managers) delivered in MQ Advanced V9.0.4 gets updated to add support for a Disaster Recovery mode, with manual takeover after either synchronous, or asynchronous replication between a pair of MQ servers.


The MQ Managed File Transfer capability, available with MQ Advanced or MQ Appliance gets the first support for the REST API admin interface for listing current transfers and querying MFT Agent status.


MQ Advanced itself will do more to identify itself when it is installed, and so prevent compliance issues, and ensures that components can recognize Queue Managers.


Other updates include a MQ Console refresh, and for customers who use MQ with WebSphere Application Server, performance enhancement through implicit syncpointing.


For MQ Appliance users there is an enhancement for better reliability by allowing aggregated IP interfaces for the Floating IP feature. This removes a potential single point of failure.


And for users of MQ Advanced for z/OS Value Unit Edition there have been improvements including enhancements to MQ AMS which will see increased performance.

MQ clouds puttenham

Perhaps even more exciting is the new availability of a hosted instance of MQ on the Cloud. More about this can be found here, but it creates a great opportunity to quickly and easily make use of MQ without needing to install, deploy or manage the environment. Just configure and go! Nice that after 5 years of talking about it on this blog we have an explicit offering running in the cloud. This is of course alongside MQ already being able to run in AWS as a QuickStart. Or deployed as containers in IBM Cloud private.


As well as looking forward in the future to a new Long Term Support release, the statement of direction indicated that the Blockchain bridge, available in MQ Advanced, will be updated to be based on the Hyperledger Composer interfaces. And additionally, customers deploying MQ in containers will in the future be able to track the size of the container, and the duration of use, and license based on that container size, rather than the full capacity of the system where the container is running. The intent will be to support existing pricing metrics such as PVUs and VPC monthly metrics, but also a future VPC Hourly metric.


IBM MQ, along with many other IBM and business partner solutions will be some of the highlights discussed at IBM Think in Las Vegas running March 19th-22nd. I will be there and I hope to see some of you there as well. Famously Las Vegas never sleeps, so I guess that’s something else that’s not 9 to 5. Lucky we have IBM MQ V9.0.5 now though.




Setting out markers for MQ’s road ahead

February 16, 2016


Working as the Offering Manager for IBM MQ and the IBM Messaging Portfolio, there are lots of parts of my day-to-day work that I can’t share on here until we announce it. However there are times when we can provide a small look ahead at what’s coming. This is called in IBM a “Statement of Direction”. And today IBM MQ has released a Statement of Direction for both IBM MQ and for the IBM MQ Appliance.

You can read the Statement of Direction here.
As you will see in reading it we are talking about a couple of important points. I will deal with the MQ Appliance statement first. As covered elsewhere in this blog, there has been a lot of interest in the MQ Appliance since we announced it at IBM InterConnect 2015 – just about 1 year ago. One of its key features has been about the High Availability function – the simple way to connect up two appliances and to allow for seamless failover between them benefitting from synchronous replication.
At the end of 2015, as detailed here IBM extended this High Availability option with asynchronous replication to other MQ Appliances, which could be deployed further away, offering Disaster Recovery. However, deployments needed to choose either one style of replication or another, on a Queue Manager by Queue Manager basis. So a Queue Manager on a MQ Appliance could be defined for High Availability, or for Disaster Recovery, but not both.
This created an obvious question when we discussed this with customers, who in some cases would want to have local MQ Appliances offering High Availability, but in the case of a whole site failure, wanted to then offer Disaster Recovery off-site. As giving forward looking statements can be an issue without legal clearance, we have ensured that with this Statement of Direction we can clearly state and assure customers that IBM indeed does intend to support the ability of Queue Managers to be configured for both High Availability and Disaster Recovery in a future update.


For MQ itself the Statement of Direction covers less function, and more the delivery and support approach used for MQ itself. For many years IBM has released updates to IBM MQ every 2-3 years as major new versions, and sometimes with additional interim updates as incremental releases. But over the last few years IBM has been adding function into the regular fixpack deliverables where we also include maintenance updates alongside the new function.
While this approach allows IBM to add useful new functions between releases, and thus getting it to customers earlier, it can lead some customers to choose to keep their MQ implementations on older releases until IBM stops adding new function to that particular release. The concern is that adding new function in a release that will be used in production can create the need to have a major new testing cycle, even if IBM has designed that the new function is off by default.
As IBM thinks customers would benefit from being at the latest level of code, and certainly IBM wants to encourage customers to stay up to date with the latest fixpacks, IBM has decided to offer two separate code delivery and support options.

One option will be the Long Term Support Stream. A new version of MQ will be released, and from that point on, there will be no new function shipped on that code-stream. The fixpacks that IBM will continue to ship on a regular basis will only contain fixes to existing functions and no new functions will be added. As such it should be simpler and safer for customers to move more rapidly to this level of code and to then stay on it as fixes are rolled out, improving stability and performance.
The second option will be the Continuous Delivery option. Based off the same original code drop as the Long Term Support option, subsequent updates will be delivered containing not just fixes but also incremental new function. Each mod-level update will be designed to continue to add new function. And, important to understand, customers who choose to deploy the Continuous Delivery stream will have to keep taking the additional functional increments and fixes if they want to stay on that stream by moving to the most recent mod-level. If they decide they want to be on the Long Term Support stream then will need to change the MQ installed which will likely cause a degree of disruption as they will effectively be moving to a different release. While this continuous delivery of function will ensure that customers of MQ will have new functions that enhance MQ and the operation of their environment, those customers will need to be able to continue to update their environment with each update as it is delivered. For many customers this might be appropriate as they have a need for the new function or they may want to apply it only to a particular environment and set of applications.


After a number of functional updates to the Continuous Delivery Stream of IBM MQ, over probably a period of 2 years or so, it is expected that the incremental set of new functions delivered in the Continuous Delivery Stream will be released as the new starting point for the next version of the Long Term Support stream, and will reset the version for the Continuous Delivery Stream as well. The cycle them will repeat again, with fixes applied to the Long Term Support Stream and new mod-level updates with new function (as well as fixes) delivered to the Continuous Delivery Stream.

This new approach for delivering MQ may be significantly important for some customers as they make future plans, and IBM therefore thought it was important to set this out in a Statement of Direction prior to a future announcement of a new release of IBM MQ supporting this model.

As for when any new releases to backup these Statements of Direction are coming out? Well, keep watching this space.