Posts Tagged ‘espresso’

Life’s too short to drink bad coffee?

February 4, 2014

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It has been a lot longer than I wanted since I last wrote an entry on this blog. I guess I have been searching for inspiration. The problem of course being that I work on a lot of things that I can’t talk about until they are ready to announce. So what can I say about what we already have in the market?

I was struck last week with some inspiration. I don’t recommend getting your inspiration the same way, as I was off sick for a couple of days with a temperature of 104F, but it did give me a couple of days thinking time, on a restricted diet. One of the things I was missing was my espresso and cappuccino. I have, for reasons that don’t matter here, two separate espresso machines. A manual La Pavoni and a Gaggia Classic. For either to make decent espresso you need freshly ground coffee, ideally from freshly roasted beans.

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I buy my beans from a small UK roaster called hasbean, and have been for a number of years. But here’s the thing. Until a few months ago, I had just bought the same ‘espresso blend’ of beans from them. I went to their website, clicked on their ‘blends’ page, selected the espresso blend I chose, and bought it. Again and again. I was perfectly happy with my choice. The beans were roasted that day and posted out. I would drink my coffee and be happy. Except (and you knew that was coming) I gradually thought there might be something more. Maybe my coffee could be better. I knew it was already way better than the coffee providers on the high street. In fact it was rare I would drink a coffee outside the house that I liked as much as mine. But my feeling persisted. And maybe what I might have done would have been to find another roaster. But all of a sudden, when I was on the hasbean website about to buy some more coffee, I looked a little closer at the website – and clicked on one of the tabs for a specific coffee region…in this case I clicked on America. And there a whole world opened up. Yes there was Brazil, which I knew provided many of the beans in my chosen blend. But there were options for Bolivia, Guatemala, Colombia, El Salvador. The list went on. And click a country, and there was even more choice. Individual producers. Detailed notes of the crop, the harvest conditions, the processing method, and tasting notes. A whole world of choice ready to be roasted and posted.

This was what I had been missing, and it was there for me all along, right in front of my face. Now I am selecting a range of individual beans, drinking different, better coffee, but from the same roaster, and mostly at the same price I was paying. There was even an option to pay a little more for some exceptional beans. Truly a win-win.

So is this relevant for WebSphere MQ users? Well I did visit a long standing customer last month who admitted that they didn’t use any publish-subscribe. Now IBM has been suggesting trying out publish-subscribe for years. It is there in the product. There is no additional cost to use it. And for many uses, you get far more flexible deployments.

Then there is security. Changes made in the V7.1 release back in 2011 gave the product far more usable security, but still customers continue to use exits which now ought to be redundant thanks to the same or better function in the product. Then there are transactional clients, improvements in clustering, API options, etc. etc. And that’s before I even start mentioning Telemetry support, Managed File Transfer and Advanced Message Security options.

Now I understand that WebSphere MQ isn’t a cup of coffee, even if an espresso machine can be complex to use well. Applications connected with WebSphere MQ are systems that run for years, or even decades. And it can take quite a bit of work to consider changing them. But with features like multi-version install, and even the new ability to download the entire WebSphere MQ Advanced stack at no cost for development use, we have been working to make it easier to try new ways of using WebSphere MQ. So at no additional cost, you could be making your applications more flexible, more robust or more secure. You could be simplifying your administration tasks, and reducing the overhead of recurring operational activities. And for a little more you could be encrypting messages end to end without changing your applications, or using your MQ network to move your file data, and to make better use of it. I am pretty sure that with MQTT you could even hook up your coffee machine to your smartphone. 

Now that I have been trying the new coffees I won’t be going back to less variety. Why shouldn’t you be trying some of the good stuff too? Tomorrow morning I’ll be drinking for the first time some Colombian El Meridiano Rioblanco Washed. What are you going to be trying tomorrow?

 

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