Posts Tagged ‘Cloud Messaging’

No waiting in these queues. IBM MQ V9 and the MQ Appliance M2001 delivers fast, reliable and secure message queuing

June 29, 2016

wile_e_coyote

Recent weeks have been pretty busy on this blog, reflecting just how busy the MQ development team has been in bringing out new and updated offerings in MQ V9 and the MQ Appliance M2001 here and here. And of course in our cloud messaging options.

As both of these have been fairly full of new content I thought I would do just a short update to focus on a couple of key benefits which are specifically measurable in these 2 refreshed offerings. After all, a lot of the new and improved features can sometimes be hard to quantify in terms of the benefits they provide, but in each offering this time there are some easy to define benefits.

As you may have seen in my most recent update, the MQ Appliance M2001 added large capacity SSD storage which enables much faster throughput for persistent messages. These are the messages that get written to storage to ensure they are still available in the case of failure before the message has been successfully deliver to all consumers. At high rates of message throughput, there can be a lot of contention for access to storage with traditional hard drives. With the new MQ Appliance M2001, this potential bottleneck has been removed. You can now read the latest MQ Appliance M2001 performance report here which shows that the performance in those scenarios which saw large volumes of persistent messages sees improvement of up to 3.5 times the previous message rate.

Clearly this represents a significant improvement and given that persistent messages are used in those business critical situations where IBM MQ delivers so much value, it is a hugely important benefit.

 

In MQ V9 there were a number of enhancements but the one I specifically want to call out is, as part of the MQ Advanced package, the enhancement to MQ Advanced Message Security (MQ AMS). The change here was to add a new mode of operation – Confidentiality. This new mode changed the way in which the encryption operations are performed on the message contents (MQ AMS offers policy based encrypted message contents which ensures data at rest is protected in case of a security breach). The goal of this change was to continue to offer a strong level of security for the message contents without too big of an impact on the performance and throughput from the effects of the encryption used.

Now instead of new asymmetric keys being generated for every exchange, the feature can be configured to allow for reusable symmetric keys to be used after the initial generation of an asymmetric key. This still provides a very high level of security, but depending on the reuse count before a new asymmetric key is generated, can drastically cut the performance overhead. The benefits can see more than an order of magnitude increase in throughput. You can see a quick snap shot of some of the early results in Jon Rumsey’s blog here – which includes a small table showing performance improvements exceeding 10x gains. With everyone concerned about security these days, the ability to better protect your information and customer data with little performance impact has to be a good thing.

 

So what are you waiting for? With secure, reliable enterprise messaging for on-premise deployments, cloud deployments or physical appliances, there is no waiting with IBM MQ V9 or IBM MQ Appliance M2001.

no-waiting

[An interesting history of Wile E. Coyote here]

MQ in the Cloud – Your messaging ‘silver lining’

May 16, 2016

MQ clouds puttenham

As the senior product manager for a product like IBM MQ, I don’t just spend my day writing blogs – but frequently get questions from both colleagues and our many customers. And recently, one of the most common questions I get is whether MQ runs in the cloud.

The answer is “Yes” – that was easy wasn’t it.

However maybe there is some more information to share, to help describe the journey to cloud and to exploit the benefits provided by IBM MQ at every step, whether you are looking for enterprise grade business critical messaging in your private cloud infrastructure, in a public cloud (hosted or not) or a hybrid cloud spanning the combination of these.

 

Mostly the cloud environment that IBM customers I have been talking to are thinking about is best described as “Hybrid”. Almost all of our customers are starting to explore some aspects of the benefits of cloud – and what it means to them. But deployment, especially of business critical applications, is likely to happen in stages. Today many customers run virtually all application workload on-premise, but typically this will be in virtual machine environments. There is a shift to deploy selected workload in the cloud. Perhaps this might start with engagement or marketing applications, but these applications and the associated workload doesn’t run in isolation on the cloud but in conjunction with the rest of the enterprise running on-premise, or connecting to partners in the wider business ecosystem. Then as businesses shift some of their critical back office applications to cloud deployment options, the hybrid nature of infrastructure will increase.

Fundamental to the success of this change is the availability of reliable and secure connectivity to allow the safe and scalable exchange of information between applications independent of whether they are running together in the cloud, on-premise or any other combination.

How does IBM MQ work in this type of deployment? Well, as has been proven for more than 20 years, IBM MQ provides a way to exchange data in the form of messages between applications, systems and services and to do so reliably, securely, rapidly and simply. Messages are moved through MQ Queue Managers that can be deployed locally to the application – wherever that application may be, or remote from the application but accessed by MQ Clients bound to the application.

In pretty much any type of hybrid environment, MQ continues to be a critically useful middleware tool. Either the application running in the cloud environment can make use of the MQ Client to connect to a MQ Queue Manager running elsewhere (such as on-premise) or the MQ Queue Manager can itself be deployed in the cloud environment along with the application. And you might use your own tools to deploy MQ, or you could use tools such as Chef to deploy MQ. Other options for deployment include a MQ plug-in for IBM UrbanCode Deploy.

MQ offers support for running on IBM SoftLayer, Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, and OpenStack cloud. It leverages a Bring Your Own Software License to make it simple for customers to choose where to deploy the IBM MQ license entitlements they may already have. For deployments of IBM MQ on SoftLayer you might choose to use the MQ Advanced pattern designed for IBM PureSystems which can run on the SoftLayer environment.

In addition to this deployment style, IBM recently confirmed MQ is supported to run in Docker environments which further extends where MQ might be deployed to meet customer needs, such as hosted PaaS environments like IBM Bluemix.

Docker_(container_engine)_logo

So basically for every cloud environment, or virtualised environment, or container, your business can continue to take advantage of the benefits of IBM MQ – whether by running MQ Queue Managers in the cloud environment, or continuing to run them on-premise (perhaps as the physical MQ Appliance), or in any hybrid combination.

So what are you waiting for? For MQ on cloud – the answer is yes.

*UPDATED to add link to the AWS example – see above*